Sunset Film Society Logo

 

 

WEEKLY - Film Series

 

 Saturdays at 2:00 PM

 

 

Hosted at

The El Paso

International Museum of Art

 

1211 Montana Avenue

 

 

Free Admission & Free Parking!

 

Freshly Popped Theater Popcorn, Beverages, Candy & Snacks Available for Purchase

 

 

Come join our Film Series...Now monthly or weekly!

 

What began in June, 2000 as the first weekly Classic Film Series in the El Paso Southwest, returns as an ongoing film series—now having grown to offering both monthly and weekly!

 

SFS meets MONTHLY (either on Saturday or Sunday) at Ardovino's Desert Crossing in Sunland Park. Come out early or stay late for cocktails and dinner. See map and directions.

 

And now SFS meets WEEKLY at the International Museum of Art in downtown El Paso.

 

*BOTH film venues are FREE of charge to the public.*

 

Jay Duncan, host, the Sunset Film Society and founder, CEO of Jay's Pix Presents.Hosted by life long film fan, historian, archivist, writer and collector Jay Duncan. When it comes to the magic of the motion picture, Jay enthusiastically shares his wealth of knowledge, personal exhibits of his own movie memorabilia and in-depth behind-the-scenes knowledge with each and every screening.

 

Join Jay as he hosts the ever popular Sunset Film Society series and get to know first-hand what everyone is talking about!

 

For more information and to make reservations, please email Jay.

 

NOTE: All presentations will include added attractions to simulate the original movie-going experience.  It might be a cartoon, short, featurette or serial chapter.

Experience the CLASSIC FILM SERIES presentations:

 

•  Historical background of each film presentation

•  Film(s) showing

•  Post presentation: discussions, questions & answers, audience participation.

•  Education and insight into the cultural significance of FILM as an “Artistic Medium”

•  Information on the Sunset Film Society

“The Art of Cinematography calls for so much experiment, necessitates so many kinds of activity and requires so much sustained attention, that I do not hesitate to say in all sincerity that it is the most alluring and the most interesting of all the Arts, for it makes use of virtually all of them—drawing, painting, the drama, sculpture, architecture, mechanics and manual labor of every sort are called into play in pursuing this extraordinary profession.”

                                                                           — Georges Melies 1861-1938, French Film Pioneer

 

 

MONTHLY - Film Series

 

 

SUNDAY — APRIL 23rd

4 PM

Sunset Hall

THE GODFATHER

(Paramount: 1972)

175 minutes + Intermission

Technicolor

 

 

 

The SUNSET FILM SOCIETY and Ardovino's Desert Crossing if proud to present - A Special Movie Event! In celebration of the 45th Anniversary of THE GODFATHER (1972), we will be presenting the original, uncut Academy Award-winning classic.

 

 More >

COMEDIES, DRAMAS & DRAMADIES — This month brings a "Mulligan Stew" of diverse films, featuring 2 major stars in one film, a personal favorite of the leading man, an insightful and wry look at upward mobility and one of the finest performances by a major New York film and stage actor.

April 8th ~ 2 pm

 

THE BUCKET LIST

 

(Warner Bros: 2007) 97 minutes, Color

 

Starring: Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman

Directed by Rob Reiner

Written by Justin Zachham.

 

Two 70-year-old men with diverse backgrounds  meet in a hospital after both having been diagnosed with a terminal illness. One of the men compiles a "bucket list" and on their road trip with a wish list, they attempt to do the things before they "kick the bucket". You only live once, so why not go out in style? Two great stars provide the heart and soul, wit and wiles of this inspired salute to life that proves that the best time of all is right now.

 

April 15th ~ 2 pm

 

HARVEY

 

(Universal: 1950) 104 minutes, B&W

 

Starring:  James Stewart, Josephine Hull (Academy Award winner, Best Supporting Actress), Peggy Dow, Cecil Kellaway

Directed by Henry Koster

 

Elwood P. Dowd is a middle-aged, amiable, yet eccentric man whose best friend is a 6' 3½" tall rabbit named Harvey. As described by Dowd, Harvey is a pooka, a benign but mischievous creature from Celtic mythology who is especially fond of social outcasts (like Elwood). Naturally this fact brings consternation to his sister and niece, who live with him and seek a "normal" life. Based on Mary Chase's play of the same name and one of Stewart's favorite film roles.

April 22nd ~ 2 pm

 

LOST IN AMERICA

 

(Warner Bros: 1985) 91 minutes, Color

 

Starring:  Albert Brooks, Julie Hagerty (Airplane!), Garry Marshall

Co-written (with Monica Johnson) and directed by Brooks

 

David and Linda Howard are typical 1980s yuppies in Los Angeles who are fed up with their lifestyle. He works in an advertising agency and she for a department store. After he fails to receive a promotion he was counting on and is instead asked to transfer to the firm's New York office, David angrily insults his boss and is fired. He coaxes his wife to quit her job as well and seek a new adventure. The Howards decide to sell their house, liquidate their assets, drop out of society, "like in Easy Rider", and travel the country in a Winnebago recreational vehicle.

April 29th ~ 2 pm

 

SERPICO

 

(Paramount: 1973) 129 minutes, Color

 

Starring:  Al Pacino, John Randolph, and El Paso's F. Murray Abraham in an early screen appearance.

 

Frank Serpico is an idealistic New York cop who refuses to take bribes, unlike many of his fellow officers. His actions get Frank shunned by his co-workers on the police force, often placing him in dangerous situations. This American neo-noir crime drama was directed by Sidney Lumet. Waldo Salt and Norman Wexler wrote the screenplay, adapting Peter Maas's biography of real-life NYPD officer Frank Serpico. Poignant score by Mikis Theodorakis.

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